Knowledge Management

From “Knowledge Management” on Wikipedia:

Knowledge may be accessed at three stages: before, during, or after KM-related activities. Different organizations have tried various knowledge capture incentives, including making content submission mandatory and incorporating rewards into performance measurement plans. Considerable controversy exists over whether incentives work or not in this field and no consensus has emerged.

One strategy to KM involves actively managing knowledge (push strategy). In such an instance, individuals strive to explicitly encode their knowledge into a shared knowledge repository, such as a database, as well as retrieving knowledge they need that other individuals have provided to the repository.[13] This is also commonly known as the Codification approach to KM.

Another strategy to KM involves individuals making knowledge requests of experts associated with a particular subject on an ad hoc basis (pull strategy). In such an instance, expert individual(s) can provide their insights to the particular person or people needing this (Snowden 2002). This is also commonly known as the Personalization approach to KM.

Other knowledge management strategies and instruments for companies include:

  • rewards (as a means of motivating for knowledge sharing)
  • storytelling (as a means of transferring tacit knowledge)
  • cross-project learning
  • after action reviews
  • knowledge mapping (a map of knowledge repositories within a company accessible by all)
  • communities of practice
  • expert directories (to enable knowledge seeker to reach to the experts)
  • best practice transfer
  • knowledge fairs
  • competence management (systematic evaluation and planning of competences of individual organization members)
  • proximity & architecture (the physical situation of employees can be either conducive or obstructive to knowledge sharing)
  • master-apprentice relationship
  • collaborative technologies (groupware, etc.)
  • knowledge repositories (databases, bookmarking engines, etc.)
  • measuring and reporting intellectual capital (a way of making explicit knowledge for companies)
  • knowledge brokers (some organizational members take on responsibility for a specific “field” and act as first reference on whom to talk about a specific subject)
  • social software (wikis, social bookmarking, blogs, etc.)
  • Inter-project knowledge transfer

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